10 mods that will turn your Tacoma into an off-road beast | Jobs Reply


The Toyota Tacoma has been roaming the streets of America for many years. If you think about it, it’s incredible how a car made by a foreign brand can be so successful in a country that boasts of everything indigenous. What makes the Tacoma so famous is its great capability (both in towing and off-roading), comfort and most importantly, reliability. The current model has been on sale longer than most pickup trucks on the market today, and it’s still selling like hotcakes People are aware that this is a tried and tested platform. There is no risk with buying a Tacoma, everything will work as it should. Since off-roading and adventure driving are becoming increasingly popular, it only makes sense to create an article that includes the best mods for this truck.


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1/10 Advanced leaf and coil springs

Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro Upgraded Suspension
Toyota Media

The suspension is upgraded to a Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro

As you may know, the Tacoma features coil overs at the front end and leaf springs at the rear. This combination gives the front end the required stability and ride quality while the leaf springs provide stability and payload capacity. Upgraded leaf and coil springs will lift the truck and also improve its payload. Off-road springs are usually stiffer because they have to compensate for the center of gravity and also provide the ability to carry off-road gear. Before choosing your springs, you need to have a good idea of ​​how much weight your Tacoma will carry. This will help you choose the right spring stiffness.

2/10 A longer shock will give you more articulation

Toyota Tacoma Action Shot
Toyota Media

A Toyota Tacoma drives over a muddy trail

In many cases, the articulation limitation in a solid axle suspension is shock length. Now, the Tacoma comes with leaf springs in the rear, so you won’t be able to gain a huge improvement by installing a longer shock. However, you will definitely get some extra travel. Choosing a good off-road brand will help the truck behave well both on-road and off-road. Since the Tacoma’s front end is an independent suspension, installing longer shocks won’t affect travel much. However, you can still install off-road-rated ones that will provide durability benefits.

Related: What to Look for When Buying an Old Land Rover Defender

3/10 Tacoma diff locker required

Toyota Tacoma Action Shot
Toyota Media

An action shot of a Toyota Tacoma off-roading

The Tacoma TRD Pro comes equipped with a rear locker, however, lower-spec models come with an open diff. When off-roading, open diffs are not good because they transmit power to wheels with less grip. A differential locker eliminates this problem and greatly improves a vehicle’s off-road capabilities. Ideally, diff lockers are installed both front and rear, providing true four-wheel-drive. However, if for some reason you want to go for just one locker, it’s best to start with the back end. This is the axis that is most effective in most cases when locked.

4/10 Protect the body with steel bumpers

Toyota Tacoma front three-quarter shot
Toyota Media

Front three-quarter shot of a Toyota Tacoma in the desert

Steel bumpers are a great addition if you tackle really tough trails or travel through areas with lots of wildlife. In off-road situations, a steel bumper can hit when you end your departure or approach angle. But most importantly, they will protect your car from possible impacts with animals when traveling through country roads. When driving on empty back roads, animals often run across the road. At speed, a collision with a large animal can destroy the front end of your truck. A steel bumper will provide protection in such situations.

RELATED: Why upgrading your tires is important for off-roading

5/10 A winch is great insurance

Toyota Tacoma side shot
Toyota Media

Toyota Tacoma rolling in the desert

Having a winch on your Tacoma is a great idea. You never know when you or one of your companions might need it. There are situations where getting a truck out of trouble simply won’t work. The power and control offered by a winch is simply unmatched. For the Tacoma, we’d recommend going with a unit that’s rated for at least 9,000 pounds. If you have a steel bumper installed, attaching a winch to the car will be a breeze because these types of bumpers have designated spots for the winch. This change will enable you and your Tacoma to travel alone.

6/10 Beadlock wheels will provide more grip

Toyota Tacoma detail shot
Toyota Media

Stock Toyota Tacoma wheels

How can a wheel provide more grip? Well, enabling the driver to run at low tire pressure. A bedlock wheel, as the name suggests, locks the bead of the tire to prevent it from coming off when running off-road with extremely low tire pressure. The reason off-roaders run at lower pressures is to increase the tire footprint. Be warned though, in some areas of the world, bedlock wheels are illegal. Cheap products can also create balance problems which then lead to steering wobbles and vibrations. Before buying, check the rules of the road and make sure you are buying from a reputable brand.

RELATED: 10 Modifications That Will Bring Your Old Land Rover Defender into the Modern Age

7/10 Bigger tires are the most effective upgrade

Toyota Tacoma side shot
Toyota Media

Side shot of a Toyota Tacoma in the desert

Larger tires are one of the most common and effective modifications you can make to your Tacoma. The reason it is so effective is the increased footprint but larger rolling diameter. Bigger tires go over obstacles easier than smaller tires. However, you have to be careful here. Bigger tires tend to be heavier and throw off your gearing. This means that your truck will be slower and more prone to breakdowns. If you want the perfect fit, go up a size or two. Choosing an all-terrain or mud terrain is also important. It will provide grip and puncture resistance.

8/10 Keep all mechanical parts intact including underbody protection

Toyota Tacoma front three-quarter shot
Toyota Media

Front three-quarter shot of a Toyota Tacoma off-roading

Underbody protection is crucial for off-roading and especially for the Tacoma. Since it uses independent suspension, one of the most exposed and important parts is the oil pan. Breaking your oil pan on rocks will be a disaster; Therefore, it is important to cover it with thick protection. It’s worth noting that TRD Pro trim levels are equipped with excellent skid plates; Therefore, you don’t really have to change them. If your Tacoma is a lower trim, it might be worth going for aftermarket options or finding some used TRD Pros for a more “factory” look.

Related: 10 Best Vehicles for Overlanding

9/10 Wade in the deep river with a snorkel

Toyota Tacoma Action Shot
Toyota Media

The Toyota Tacoma is tackling a tough hill

A snorkel or buoyancy aid has many functions. First, it helps the car breathe air from above which leads to less dust in the intake. It also acts as a cold air intake. However, the most common function of a snorkel is to enable a vehicle to pass through deep water. In standard form, the Tacoma can safely wade water up to mid-bumper depth. However, with a fully sealed snorkel, water can pass over the hood and the truck will continue to run. Obviously, driving through such deep water is risky, but there are times when you really don’t expect such depth. This is a perfect example of how a snorkel can save your engine.

10/10 Protect your Tacoma’s doors and sills with rock sliders

Toyota Tacoma
Toyota Media

Toyota Tacoma is tackling the desert

Doors and sills are one of the most common places to get damaged while off-roading. Since the Tacoma is a longer vehicle, it is more prone to this problem. Rock sliders are usually steel steps that go under your sill to protect them from rock impact. Such modifications keep your truck body straight and enable you to have fun off-road. Rock sliders can also act as great spots on which to mount a high lift jack if you need to lift the car off the ground while off-roading. These are must-have items in any Tacoma!



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