Toyota Collaboration on Fukushima Recovery Aims for Carbon Neutral Biomass Fuels | the news | Jobs Reply


Toyota has signed an agreement with three mostly-evacuated cities in Futaba District in Japan’s Fukushima Prefecture to develop carbon-neutral agriculture for biomass fuel. The 2011 earthquake damaged the Fukushima nuclear power plant and left the area abandoned.

Toyota has signed an agreement with three mostly-evacuated cities in Futaba District in Japan’s Fukushima Prefecture to develop carbon-neutral agriculture for biomass fuel. The 2011 earthquake damaged the Fukushima nuclear power plant and left the area abandoned.

According to the partnership, the three towns of Okuma, Futaba and Namye will each play a role in growing crops that will eventually produce bio-ethanol in Okuma. Okuma and Futaba will restore soil fertility to land unusable since the 2011 earthquake and develop a low-carbon agricultural system to provide animal feed. That feed will then be transported to Namie, where a herd of cows maintained by Okuma and Futaba Agriculture will provide manure as fertilizer for continued soil restoration at Okuma and Futaba.

Toyota’s role in the project is to contribute its expertise after years of research and development in Fukushima and other areas affected by pollution. Toyota will offer soil texture measurement and analysis and use drones to monitor how crops grow across farmland, as it has been restored in Okuma and Futaba.

The goal is not only to reclaim land and decontaminate soil but to eventually create a carbon neutral agricultural system, which will not only produce feedstock for livestock but also for a bioethanol plant in Okuma. Toyota is already part of the Research Association of Biomass Innovation for Next Generation Automobile Fuels, a six-company alliance including ENEOS, Suzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu and Toyota Tsusho Corporation, Toyota’s trading arm. Established in July 2022, the alliance specifically aims to develop efficient ethanol production in Okuma, for which an alternative would use crops grown as part of this initial project between Toyota and the three cities.



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